Natural History Museum

Cranium

Desambiguação

"The body parts of the animal which are photographed make us move back and forward between a feeling of horror, a surprising – and not disturbing – strangeness and a desire to see and know more. "

− Eder Chiodetto – Generation 00: The New Brazilian Photography

"Daniel Malva is a pacifier. Caught in the middle of the debate on analogical versus digital cameras, he prefers the ones that takes pictures."

− Ana Pinho – HOTEL UNIQUE MAG 2014

"Daniel Malva is fascinated by natural history and often use 17 and 18 century aesthetics in his photographs."

− Lars Eivind Bones for Dagbladet Magasinet

"Malva works with a unique photographic technique which allows him to at once highlight
and obscure the subject."

− Anna Dora Wallace-Thompson - About "Gabinete de Curiosidades" - London 2014

"Daniel puts history and science into a contemporary perspective. "

− Kristin Hjellegjerde - Gallery sofa conversations – Oslo 2014

"The cross-linking of science and art continues to grow and Malva’s work is yet another example of an exhibition that combines both scientific interest and artistic merit in an engaging display."

− Tabish Khan, About "Gabinete de Curiosidades" - London 2014 for Londonist

some articles about Daniel Malva:

From artless to art

By: Eder Chiodetto – Generation 00: The New Brazilian Photography, SESC, São Paulo, Brazil

Daniel Malva, greatly influenced by the photography theorist Wilén Flusser, photographs skeletons or organs of animals, which certainly belong to a collection of natural history in a museum. But that is where the work gets all its value, it is how he shoots that makes the photographer stand out: the target subject sometimes is not centered and sometimes appears only in pieces; but, above all, it is very pale, as if the time exposure was insufficient. A dual work of unfulfillment is the used and eventually establishes a dreamlike atmosphere and a chance to daydream.

The body parts of the animal which are photographed make us move back and forward between a feeling of horror, a surprising – and not disturbing – strangeness and a desire to see and know more. One then thinks back to all the images resulting from the artless that torment us and feed us, both those of our childhood dreams and those generated by media which have invaded our consciousness and our unconscious.

A DUAL WORK OF UNFULFILLMENT IS THE USED AND EVENTUALLY ESTABLISHES A DREAMLIKE ATMOSPHERE AND A CHANCE TO DAYDREAM.

To be able to produce such images, the photographer invented a rather unusual camera that allows him to review the ancient techniques of photography and take root – at least notionally – in the years 183-1875, the golden age of photography and natural history: soon after, Jules Verne wrote his work that travels between scientism and oneirism: reread Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea.

Dagbladet Magasinet

By: Lars Eivind Bones

Is it possible to say that a photograph is slow enough that a frozen image at all describe the time? In this case, well this is an example. Heart that metaphor is widely used in art. It describes life and love and all that, but it can also be an image of our common biological heritage, and that it shall not tamper too much with? A conceptual photography begins with an idea, and then makes one which describes this. The question is whether we assume the image can understand what the photographer thinks? Or is it not so important? Personally I like the milky and bleach transition between the human and the animal. It is a carnivore hearts we see.
About photographer

IS IT POSSIBLE TO SAY THAT A PHOTOGRAPH IS SLOW ENOUGH THAT A FROZEN IMAGE AT ALL DESCRIBE THE TIME?

Daniel Malva (37) was born in Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. At the age of 13 years he began to draw for a commercial facility. After that studied Malva biology, photography and Mechatronics (a combination of mechanics, electronics and computer engineering). He is fascinated by natural history and often use 17 and 1800 century aesthetics in his photographs. The images of Malva set for time out on Shoot Gallery in Oslo.
– Lars Eivind Bones

(Out Of) Focus

By: Ana Pinho – HOTEL UNIQUE MAG 2014

Daniel Malva is a pacifier. Caught in the middle of the debate on analogical versus digital cameras, he prefers the ones that takes pictures. “I can’t imagine myself picking a side“, says.“Trying to compare the two is like arguing between watercolor and oil paint, a pointless discussion.“Born in Ribeirão Preto, in the state of São Paulo, he was drawn into the misteries of photography twelve years ago, taking naked pictures in his student times at Senac, in São Paulo, and developing them himself in a black and white film lab where he worked at the time.
The result of his Rolleicord experiment ended up becoming the work presented for his graduation term and his first photos to be featured in a gallery exhibition, in 2009.

TO CREATE HIS OWN PRIVATE WORLD, DANIEL BUILDS AND MODIFIES HIS CAMERAS AND LENSES HIMSELF AND USES UNUSUAL OBJECTS TO DO.

A few years later, he crossed the ocean and got his own solo art show in both London, where he is represented by Kristin Hjellegjerde Gallery (www.kristinhjellegjerde.com), and Oslo, hosted by norwegian Shoot Gallery, in November, 2014.
Known by his artistic pictures, Malva doesn’t stick to only one style. “What attracts me is the uneasiness of images. Making people stop to think and talk about things“, he explains.
I take purposely unfocused pictures, use low resolution in my advantage and make odd choices to make people wonder about their own definitions of right and wrong.”
To create his own private world, Daniel builds and modifies his cameras and lenses himself and uses unusual objects to do so, such as shampoo bottle caps and eyeglasses lenses. Like a painter, he makes daily studies on flowers and fruits to develop new films, filters and whole aesthetics.

Daniel Malva

Malva, a Brazilian artist was born in 1977. He is represented by Kristin Hjellegjerde Gallery in London.”